Nature vs. Environment

I’m supposed to be writing an essay on a sonnet, but honestly there’s only so much Shakespeare your brain can handle before everything starts to not make sense. As I’m having this break, I thought I’d take the time to write an overdue post.

I label myself as an introvert, and my mom often tells me that I have to change from an introvert to have a more successful life (that’s another point for another day), but I also hear from some people that you are who you are and you can’t change your nature. I wonder, though, just how much of your personality is naturally who you are, and what parts of your personality is affected by your environment.

By nature, I would say I’m a “docile” and passive person. That, in turn, has been the base characteristic that shapes all my other characteristics. For example, I’ve never gone out a lot when growing up because as the only child, my parents are quite overprotective of me and worried about me when I happen to be off by myself late at night or such (In gentle words, I had relatively strict parents).

Now, people say that strict parents often end up raising kids who are more rebellious or want to go out more as an adult to make up for their lack of childhood. But I think that depends on your base nature. As I’ve always been a passive person, I grew up just accepting what my parents wanted and, thus, grew up to be someone who identifies more as an introvert – someone who would rather be by themselves, someone who gets tired very easily when out and about, and etc. If someone, by nature, was not passive but rather maybe more outspoken or lively, then I think there’s more of a chance that that person would grow up to identify more as an extrovert, set aside a rebel or anything of the likes.

I think it’s cool just how much of your natural personality and how much of your environment can take part in shaping who you are as a person and continue to grow as a person. Like, how much of yourself do you think is natural and environmentally affected? 50/50? 40/60? 70/30? It’s pretty intriguing to wonder and I’m sure we all can figure that out if we take the time to trace back through our lives and analyze it. I mean, for all I know my passiveness isn’t even a personality trait I naturally have.

What do you guys think?



For one of my class assignments recently, I had to choose a song of my choice and write a 3-4 paged paper on the meaning of it. I had to break down the song down to its core meaning and just really explore it. Song-wise, I decided to choose the song “Here” by Alessia Cara. It’s personally one of my favorite songs because it’s catchy and I also relate to the introverted meaning of the song. The singer essentially is talking about how she’s sorry if she comes off in a negative way, but really she’d rather be doing something else. It’s a great song and you all should check it out (Although, I personally prefer the cover done by SoMo and would recommend that version. It’s more mellow and suits the meaning of the lyrics).

Anyway, I presented my song and afterward talked a little bit about how I too am an introvert so I was able to really connect with the artist. My professor remarked how he is also an introvert and that he knew a great book about introversion that I should check out.

It’s called “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking” by Susan Cain. I checked out the summary of the book just now, and I’m really looking forward to reading it after my paleontology book. It partly seems to be about introverts in general and what they’re really like, and another part of it talks about how we owe many great things in society today to introverts – such as van Gogh and Dale Carnegie (who ironically set off the idea that the ideal successful person would be an extroverted type of person). And in the end, apparently she discusses how to empower an introvert and when it would make sense for one to be a “pretend-extrovert.”

I think this has been a recent change, or maybe I merely grew up, but I have become a text-book introvert (and to get it out there: no, I’m not shy or anti-social, I actually enjoy talking and meeting new people). The epitome of introverts. And with that, I’m often told that I should try to be more “outgoing” so as to make it in the world (like making connections and moving up successfully). My mom has tried advising me on being more active/bold, and even my cousin, who is successful now and works at the U.N., told me that she used to be an introvert but changed herself slowly in her college years.

I’ve always felt that I had to be more outgoing, or that as a text-book introvert, I probably will lag behind my more extroverted friends. And honestly, yeah I have extroverted friends who are making so much more progress in their career life than I am (I feel like, at least) – so that doesn’t help.

But seeing this book and reading the summary, I’m really looking forward to reading it. I think I need something like that in my life. To tell me “Heck yeah! I’m an introvert, and I’m proud of it, and I can definitely make it!” I get that in a fast-paced, somewhat competitive society, you need to be bold and initiative and such. But I think reading this book will help me realize that I don’t need to completely change myself. I just need to, as the author would talk about, know when I should be a bit more extroverted and how to utilize my introverted tendencies in various situations.

I have already embraced my introverted self since the beginning and love being an introvert, but I’d be lying if I said that I felt completely 100% confident that I’ll do well being an introvert throughout my career.

I’ll let you guys know how I find the book when I finish it! Not that I’ve started yet haha.